Athlete comes out of the closet

World
File: Jason Collins became the first active player in a major professional American team sport to reveal that he is gay, doing so to Sports Illustrated in a major cover story released on April 29, 2013. Picture: AFP

WASHINGTON - Jason Collins’s recent announcement that he is gay has received mixed reviews.

The American basketball player immediately received backing from different prominent leaders, among them US president Barrack Obama and former president Bill Clinton who classified Collins’s announcement as "an important moment for professional sports".

But some view Collins’s public declaration in a different manner.

American football star Mike Wallace reportedly expressed his opinion on the matter on social network, Twitter.

"All these beautiful women in the world and guys wanna mess with other,” tweeted Wallace.

But the comment was quickly deleted after Wallace was slammed by other users.

The White House is among those backing Collins.

"I can certainly tell you that here at the White House we view that as another example of the progress that has been made and the evolution that has been taking place in this country,” said White House spokesman Jay Carney.

“We commend him for his courage and support him. We hope that his fans and his team support him going forward."

Collins became the first active player in a major American professional team sport to reveal he is gay.

-eNCA

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